Soil Foodweb Inc.
Dr. Elaine Ingham

    Feedback From People Using Soilfood Web Methods

A dynamic group of speakers collected in San Diego earlier this spring of 2014 to discuss the advances in permaculture practices. Topics from grazing, to managing bees, to orchard production focused on the practical aspects of agriculture, but practices with a solid foundation in the underlying reasons for the practical management suggested. That an entire group such as this works with natural principles and does not try to force nature to fit into man's short-sighted control of plant productions means a practical, useful set of management tools are being developed to allow agriculture to become truly sustainable. The approach is to work WITH the planet on a long-term basis, instead of racing to short-term gains which ultimately destroy the very resources needed to stay alive. Permaculture has grasped that nature works by using the whole of life, from micro- to macro- sets of organisms, to cycle nutrients and to build soil. If we ignore any part of the system nature has used to build the biological world around us, we imperil ourselves.  

Continuing to promote sustainable practices without falling into the financial trap of selling one product, or teaching one set of practices, as if on-size-fits-all, will be a litmus test for permaculture. There is so much left to learn, so much more to be understood, we cannot afford to limit ourselves by assuming one tool, or even one set of tools, works everywhere. We need to continue to learn about the uniqueness of each area on the planet and which set of practices will allow that area to blossom. Different tools and practices are needed, or need to be combined in different ways, to be successful. Join in the joy of discovery! 

Elaine R., Ingham
President, Soil Foodweb Inc.
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Hello Farmers and Food Advocates, 

We all know how vital good food safety practices are to our community of farmers and eaters. But, bad things can still happen to the best of farmers. Farm Commons has just released a new, detailed guide to the legal aspects of a farm-related food safety incident. The detailed legal explanations explore the background behind the law while action points help farmers move forward with reducing their legal risk exposure. Download the food safety legal guide at our website. <http://farmcommons.org/resources/host-safer-more-legally-secure-farm-events> Or, if video works better, watch our recorded webinar <http://farmcommons.org/webinars> on the subject.  The beginning of summer also brings the beginning of farm events! From tours to festivals to dinners, farmers are developing new ways to show off their awesome operations. But, these events come with increased legal risk. Fortunately, many of these risks can be managed effectively. Farm Commons' newly updated guide to "Hosting Safer, More Legally Secure On-Farm Events," is now available. While learning about how things can go wrong, farmers and advocates will also find action points to help reduce legal risk exposure while having a great time. Download the on-farm events legal guide at our website.

 <http://farmcommons.org/resources/farmers-guide-reducing-legal-risks-food-safety-incident>  Farm Commons strives to provide accurate and relevant legal information to farmers- to meet that goal we ask folks accessing our resources to provide their name, email address and location. This allows us to efficiently issue updates or corrections and to get feedback so we can constantly improve. We appreciate your help.  Thanks so much and a happy growing season to everyone! 

Rachel Armstrong
Executive Director and Attorney Farm Commons www.farmcommons.org

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